41 Examples of Pathogenesis in Real Life

Examples of Pathogenesis in real life

Pathogenesis refers to the biological mechanism that leads to a diseased state. It involves the origin and development of a disease, and it’s critical for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of the condition. Examples of pathogenesis occur in daily life with various diseases. For instance, tuberculosis pathogenesis involves the inhalation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis which can cause lung tissue damage. The pathogenesis of diabetes involves the body’s inability to produce or properly use insulin, leading to abnormal blood sugar levels. Coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2 which causes COVID-19, bind to specific cell receptors, using the host cell’s machinery to replicate. Understanding the pathogenesis of these and many other diseases helps us to identify potential points of intervention and to develop effective treatments and vaccines to prevent or manage these conditions.

What is Pathogenesis?

Viral pathogenesis

Pathogenesis is the process by which a disease develops from the initial stimulus to the ultimate expression of the disease. It outlines the progression and mechanisms of disease development at the cellular and molecular level.

The term is used frequently in the field of medicine and is fundamental to understanding the cause, development, and consequence of diseases. Pathogenesis explains how factors like the environment, genetic predisposition, and infectious agents interact to produce a disease state.

In the case of infectious diseases, pathogenesis often refers to the sequence of events that occur from the entry of a pathogen (like a virus, bacteria, or parasite) into the host organism to the outcome of the disease. This includes how the pathogen spreads, how it affects the tissues, the immune response it induces, and how the disease manifests itself in terms of symptoms and clinical features.

Understanding the pathogenesis of a disease is essential for the development of effective treatments, prevention strategies, and diagnostic procedures.

What is Pathogenicity?

Pathogenicity

Pathogenicity refers to the ability of an organism, a pathogen, to cause disease in another organism, usually a host. Factors that contribute to an organism’s pathogenicity include the means of entry into the host, the type and number of cells targeted, and its ability to evade the host’s immune responses.

Pathogenicity is also related to virulence, but the two terms are not identical. Virulence is a degree or measure of pathogenicity. It refers to the severity of the disease that a pathogen causes. Some pathogens are highly virulent and cause severe disease, while others are less virulent and cause milder disease.

Understanding a pathogen’s pathogenicity and virulence is crucial for disease prevention and control, allowing scientists to design strategies to reduce the severity of diseases and block the spread of pathogens.

Difference between Pathogenesis and Pathogenicity

Though the terms “pathogenesis” and “pathogenicity” are often used interchangeably, they refer to different concepts in disease development and progression:

1. Pathogenesis refers to the biological mechanism that leads to the development of a disease. It describes the sequence of events involving the initial interaction between the cells of the body and a disease-causing agent (a pathogen, or could also be a genetic or environmental factor), the reactions and responses of the host’s body to the presence of the pathogen, and the ultimate outcome of these interactions. Pathogenesis tells the story of how a disease progresses over time from the moment of exposure to the manifestation of symptoms.

2. Pathogenicity, on the other hand, refers to the ability of an organism, typically a microorganism, to cause disease in a host organism. It describes the potential capacity of a pathogen to inflict damage on the host. Pathogenicity depends on factors such as the speed at which the pathogen can reproduce, the degree of tissue damage it can cause, and its ability to evade the host’s immune response.

Host-pathogen-interaction

Here’s a simple table outlining the differences between pathogenesis and pathogenicity:

Pathogenesis Pathogenicity
Definition Refers to the biological mechanism that leads to the development of a disease. It describes the sequence of events from initial exposure to the disease-causing factor to the manifestation of symptoms. Refers to the ability of an organism, typically a microorganism, to cause disease in a host organism. It measures the capacity of a pathogen to inflict damage on the host.
Focus Focuses on the process and progression of a disease, including the sequence of events and reactions within the host’s body. Focuses on the potential or capacity of a particular pathogen to cause disease, which is often related to the virulence of the pathogen.
Key Factors Involves factors like the pathogen’s mode of entry, the host’s immune response, and the progression of disease symptoms. Involves factors like the pathogen’s speed of reproduction, degree of tissue damage it can cause, and its ability to evade the host’s immune response.

In summary, pathogenesis is about the process of a disease’s development and progression, while pathogenicity is about a pathogen’s ability to cause a disease. Understanding both terms is crucial to developing strategies for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

Common Terms

Pathogenic infection

There are numerous terms commonly used in discussions of pathogenesis. Here are some of the most frequently used ones:

1. Pathogen: An organism that causes a disease. This can include bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.

2. Infection: The invasion and multiplication of a pathogen within the host organism. Infections may or may not result in disease.

3. Host: The organism that is invaded by a pathogen and in which the pathogen multiplies or causes disease.

4. Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity or the capacity of a pathogen to cause disease. This can be influenced by factors such as genetic makeup of the pathogen, the dose of the pathogen, and the entry point into the host.

5. Incubation Period: The time period between the invasion by a pathogen and the appearance of the first symptoms of the disease.

6. Inflammation: A protective response by the body’s immune system to infection or injury. It’s characterized by redness, heat, swelling, and pain.

7. Immune Response: The response by the host organism’s immune system to a pathogen. This can include both the innate immune response (non-specific, immediate response) and the adaptive immune response (specific, long-term response).

8. Epidemiology: The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations.

9. Zoonosis: A disease that can be transmitted from animals to humans.

10. Reservoir: Any person, animal, arthropod, plant, soil or substance in which an infectious agent normally lives and multiplies.

11. Vector: An organism, typically a biting insect or tick, that transmits a disease or parasite from one animal or plant to another.

12. Autoimmunity: A misdirected immune response that occurs when the immune system attacks the body’s own cells.

13. Chronic Disease: A disease that persists over a long period of time.

14. Acute Disease: A disease with a rapid onset, severe symptoms, and a short course.

Here’s a table featuring some common terms used in pathogenesis:

Term Definition
Pathogen An organism that causes a disease. This can include bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.
Infection The invasion and multiplication of a pathogen within the host organism. Infections may or may not result in disease.
Host The organism that is invaded by a pathogen and in which the pathogen multiplies or causes disease.
Virulence The degree of pathogenicity or the capacity of a pathogen to cause disease.
Incubation Period The time period between the invasion by a pathogen and the appearance of the first symptoms of the disease.
Inflammation A protective response by the body’s immune system to infection or injury.
Immune Response The response by the host organism’s immune system to a pathogen.
Epidemiology The study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations.
Zoonosis A disease that can be transmitted from animals to humans.
Reservoir Any person, animal, arthropod, plant, soil or substance in which an infectious agent normally lives and multiplies.
Vector An organism, typically a biting insect or tick, that transmits a disease or parasite from one animal or plant to another.
Autoimmunity A misdirected immune response that occurs when the immune system attacks the body’s own cells.
Chronic Disease A disease that persists over a long period of time.
Acute Disease A disease with a rapid onset, severe symptoms, and a short course.

These terms provide a basic vocabulary for understanding the mechanisms and processes of disease development and progression.

Examples of Pathogenesis in Real-life

  • Influenza (Flu)

Influenza (Flu)

The influenza virus is inhaled and then attaches to cells in the respiratory tract through specific receptors. It then enters the cell and uses the cell’s machinery to replicate itself. This replication can cause the cell to die, leading to symptoms such as a sore throat, coughing, and fever.

  • Streptococcus Pneumoniae

Streptococcus Pneumoniae

This bacterium is often present in the nose and throat without causing symptoms. However, if it reaches the lungs, it can cause pneumonia. The bacteria adhere to the cells of the lungs and multiply. They produce a toxin that damages the lung tissue, leading to cough, fever, and difficulty breathing.

  • HIV/AIDS

HIV-AIDS

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) enters the body through contact with certain body fluids. It then attaches to and enters immune cells (T cells), where it replicates and gradually destroys these cells. The destruction of the immune system leads to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), where the individual becomes susceptible to various opportunistic infections and cancers.

  • Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Ulcers

Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Ulcers

The bacterium Helicobacter pylori can survive in the acidic environment of the stomach by producing an enzyme that neutralizes stomach acid. It burrows into the stomach lining, causing inflammation and damage that can lead to the development of ulcers.

  • Malaria

Malaria

This disease is caused by Plasmodium parasites, which are transmitted to humans through the bites of infected mosquitoes. Once in the bloodstream, these parasites travel to the liver, where they mature and reproduce. They then invade red blood cells, leading to cycles of fever, chills, and sweating as the red blood cells are destroyed.

  • Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis

This is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When an infected person coughs or sneezes, the bacteria can be inhaled into the lungs of a nearby person. The bacteria then multiply within the host’s lung cells, causing inflammation and tissue damage, leading to symptoms such as cough, chest pain, and fatigue.

  • Salmonellosis (Food Poisoning)

Salmonellosis (Food Poisoning)

The bacterium Salmonella enters the body through contaminated food or water. It travels to the intestines where it adheres to the intestinal cells, invades them, and triggers an inflammatory response. This leads to symptoms like diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps.

  • Ebola Virus Disease

Ebola Virus Disease

The Ebola virus is transmitted to humans from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission. After the virus enters the body, it invades various types of cells, replicates, and eventually causes the cells to burst. The virus also triggers a strong inflammatory response from the immune system, which can damage blood vessels and lead to bleeding and organ failure.

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis

While not caused by an infectious agent, this is an example of pathogenesis in an autoimmune disease. In Rheumatoid Arthritis, the immune system mistakenly attacks the joints, causing inflammation and damage. This leads to symptoms such as pain, swelling, and stiffness.

  • Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer's Disease

In this neurodegenerative disorder, there’s a buildup of proteins called beta-amyloid plaques and tau tangles in the brain. These can damage and kill nerve cells, leading to the memory loss and cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The exact pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease is still not completely understood.

  • Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Here, the body becomes resistant to insulin, a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Over time, the pancreas (which produces insulin) can’t keep up with the increased demand for insulin, leading to elevated blood sugar levels. This can cause a variety of complications, including heart disease, nerve damage, kidney disease, and vision problems.

  • Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease

This disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks. Once in the host, the bacteria can spread through the bloodstream and infect various tissues, causing a range of symptoms such as fever, fatigue, skin rash, and neurological problems.

  • Coronaviruses (Including SARS-CoV-2)

Coronaviruses

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can cause illness in animals and humans. In humans, several coronaviruses are known to cause respiratory infections ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The most recently discovered coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, causes COVID-19. These viruses bind to specific receptors on the surface of cells (mainly in the respiratory system) and use the host cell’s machinery to replicate.

  • Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C

This is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus. The virus is bloodborne and can be transmitted through contact with the blood of an infected person. Once in the host, the virus targets liver cells, causing inflammation and damage over time, which can lead to liver disease and liver cancer.

  • Escherichia coli (E. coli) Infections

Escherichia coli (E. coli) Infections

While many strains of E. coli are harmless and live in the intestines of healthy humans and animals, some can cause disease. Pathogenic E. coli can cause diarrhea (sometimes bloody), urinary tract infections, respiratory illness, and other illnesses. These strains can produce toxins that damage the lining of the intestine or can invade the cells of the intestinal wall directly, leading to illness.

  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infections

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infections

Certain types of HPV can cause warts on the hands, feet, or genitals. Some types of HPV are known to cause cancers, including cervical, anal, oropharyngeal, penile, vulvar, and vaginal cancers. The virus infects the cells of the skin or mucous membranes, where it can cause cells to proliferate abnormally, potentially leading to cancer over time.

  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

MS is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the protective cover of nerve fibers in the central nervous system, called myelin. This causes communication problems between the brain and the rest of the body. The exact cause is unknown, but it’s believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

  • Chickenpox (Varicella)

Chickenpox (Varicella)

This is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. The virus is transmitted from person to person through direct contact or airborne droplets. Once in the body, the virus infects the cells and causes them to burst, leading to a characteristic itchy rash, fever, and fatigue.

  • Zika Virus Disease

Zika Virus Disease

Transmitted primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito, the Zika virus can also spread through sexual contact, from a pregnant woman to her fetus, or potentially through a blood transfusion. The virus infects cells, causing flu-like symptoms, and in pregnant women, it can cause severe birth defects such as microcephaly.

  • Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis pathogenesis

This is a genetic disorder affecting mostly the lungs but also the pancreas, liver, kidneys, and intestine. It’s characterized by the production of thick, sticky mucus that can clog the lungs and obstruct the pancreas. The buildup of mucus makes it easy for bacteria to grow and cause infections, leading to lung damage and respiratory failure over time.

  • Parkinson’s Disease

parkinson's disease pathogenesis

This is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects predominately dopamine-producing neurons in a specific area of the brain called substantia nigra. The reduction in dopamine levels causes symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and balance problems.

  • Cholera

Cholera pathogenesis

This is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The bacteria produce a toxin that affects the small intestine, causing a large amount of water to be secreted into the bowel, which leads to severe diarrhea and dehydration.

  • Dengue Fever

Dengue Fever

This disease is caused by any one of four related dengue viruses, which are transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. Once the virus enters the body, it travels to various glands where it multiplies. It then enters the bloodstream, causing symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, and joint pain. In severe cases, it can lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever, which can be fatal.

  • Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis

This is a disease in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, which can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death. Atherosclerosis is a slow, progressive disease that may start in childhood. Factors like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, and diabetes can contribute to the disease’s progression.

  • Syphilis

Syphilis

This sexually transmitted infection is caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. After an initial infection at the site of contact (usually genitals, rectum, or mouth), the bacteria can spread throughout the body, leading to a variety of symptoms, including sores, rash, and fever. If untreated, it can cause severe complications involving the heart, brain, and other organs.

  • Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis

This is a condition where the creation of new bone doesn’t keep up with the loss of old bone, leading to weakened and brittle bones that can break easily. Factors like age, hormone levels, and nutrition can contribute to the disease’s development.

  • Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

Pertussis is a highly contagious bacterial disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. The bacteria attach to the cilia that line the upper respiratory system and release toxins, which damage the cilia and cause inflammation. This leads to severe coughing fits that can last for weeks or even months.

  • Botulism

Botulism

This is a rare but serious illness caused by toxins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The toxins block nerve functions, leading to muscle paralysis. The disease can occur in a few different ways: through wound infections, ingestion of contaminated food, or, in infants, ingestion of spores that grow in the intestines and release toxins.

  • Asthma

Asthma

This is a chronic disease involving the airways in the lungs. These airways, or bronchial tubes, allow air to come in and out of the lungs. In asthma, the inside walls of the airways are swollen or inflamed, leading to symptoms like wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. Triggers can include allergens, exercise, and viral infections.

  • Crohn’s Disease

Crohn's Disease

This is a type of inflammatory bowel disease that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract from mouth to anus, leading to wide-ranging symptoms such as persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, weight loss, and fatigue. It is thought to involve an inappropriate immune response to gut bacteria.

  • Leukemia

Leukemia

This is a group of cancers that usually begin in the bone marrow and result in high numbers of abnormal white blood cells. The abnormal cells do not function like normal blood cells and can crowd out the healthy cells, leading to problems like bleeding, anemia, and infections. The exact cause of leukemia is not known, but it’s believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

  • Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia

This is a serious mental disorder characterized by a range of problems with thinking, behavior, and emotions. Symptoms may include delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, and impaired functioning. The exact cause is unknown, but both genetic and environmental factors appear to play a role.

  • Measles

Measles

This is a highly contagious virus that lives in the nose and throat mucus of an infected person. It can spread to others through coughing and sneezing. The virus can live for up to two hours in an airspace where the infected person coughed or sneezed. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, up to 90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also become infected.

  • Psoriasis

Psoriasis

This is a common skin disorder that speeds up the life cycle of skin cells. It causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin, forming scales and red patches that are sometimes painful or itchy. Psoriasis is thought to be an immune system problem that causes inflammation, leading to the overproduction of skin cells.

  • Rabies

Rabies

This is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the brain in humans and other mammals. It’s transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death.

  • Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease

This is an autoimmune disorder in which ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine. When people with celiac disease eat gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley), their body mounts an immune response that attacks the small intestine, damaging the villi, small fingerlike projections that line the small intestine and promote nutrient absorption.

  • Huntington’s Disease

Huntington's Disease

This is a genetic disorder that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. It has a broad impact on a person’s functional abilities and usually results in movement, thinking, and psychiatric disorders.

  • Gout

Gout

This is a form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, redness, and tenderness in joints. It occurs when urate crystals accumulate in the joint, causing inflammation and intense pain. These crystals can form when you have high levels of uric acid in your blood.

  • Lupus

Lupus

This is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks its own tissues, causing widespread inflammation and tissue damage in the affected organs. It can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart, and lungs.

  • Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B

This is an infectious disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) that affects the liver. It can cause both acute and chronic infections. Many people have no symptoms during the initial infection, but some develop a rapid onset of sickness with vomiting, yellowish skin, tiredness, dark urine, and abdominal pain.

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

Often referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s disease,” ALS is a specific disorder that involves the death of neurons controlling voluntary muscles. Some also use the term motor neuron disease for a group of conditions of which ALS is the most common. ALS is characterized by stiff muscles, muscle twitching, and gradually worsening weakness due to muscle wasting.

Summary

Disease Pathogenic Process
Pneumonia Bacterial or viral infection causing inflammation in the air sacs of the lungs
Tuberculosis Bacterial infection causing inflammatory lesions in the lungs and other organs
Malaria Parasitic infection causing fever, chills, and anemia
Diabetes Type 1 and 2 Autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells or insulin resistance
Alzheimer’s Disease Accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain
Rheumatoid Arthritis Autoimmune disease causing inflammation and damage to the joints
Lyme Disease Bacterial infection causing various symptoms such as fever, fatigue, skin rash, and neurological problems
Coronaviruses Viral infections causing respiratory diseases, including common cold, SARS, and COVID-19
Hepatitis C Viral infection causing inflammation and damage to the liver
Escherichia coli Infections Bacterial infection causing diarrhea and other illnesses
Human Papillomavirus Infections Viral infection causing warts and cancers
Multiple Sclerosis Autoimmune disease causing damage to the protective cover of nerve fibers
Chickenpox Viral infection causing itchy rash, fever, and fatigue
Zika Virus Disease Viral infection causing flu-like symptoms and severe birth defects
Cystic Fibrosis Genetic disorder causing the production of thick, sticky mucus that can lead to lung damage
Parkinson’s Disease Neurodegenerative disorder affecting dopamine-producing neurons
Cholera Bacterial infection causing severe diarrhea and dehydration
Dengue Fever Viral infection causing high fever, severe headache, and joint pain
Atherosclerosis Accumulation of plaque inside the arteries
Syphilis Bacterial infection causing sores, rash, and fever
Osteoporosis Imbalance in the creation and loss of bone
Pertussis Bacterial infection causing severe coughing fits
Botulism Bacterial toxin causing muscle paralysis
Asthma Chronic inflammation of the airways
Crohn’s Disease Autoimmune disease causing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract
Leukemia Cancer of the blood cells
Schizophrenia Mental disorder causing delusions, hallucinations, and impaired functioning
Measles Viral infection causing rash and fever
Psoriasis Immune system problem causing overproduction of skin cells
Rabies Viral infection causing inflammation of the brain
Celiac Disease Autoimmune disorder causing damage in the small intestine when gluten is ingested
HIV / AIDS Viral infection causing reduction in the number of immune cells
Huntington’s Disease Genetic disorder causing breakdown of nerve cells in the brain
Gout Accumulation of urate crystals in the joints causing inflammation
Lupus Autoimmune disease causing widespread inflammation and tissue damage
Hepatitis B Viral infection affecting the liver
ALS Neurodegenerative disease involving the death of neurons controlling voluntary muscles

Conclusion

Pathogenesis refers to the mechanisms leading to the development of a disease. Understanding it is crucial for developing effective treatments and preventative measures. Diseases can originate from various sources, such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, genetic mutations, and autoimmune responses, which can affect various bodily systems. Examples discussed include pneumonia, malaria, Alzheimer’s, rheumatoid arthritis, Lyme disease, diabetes, and many more. These instances demonstrate how a myriad of factors and processes can lead to diverse health conditions, underlining the complexity of human health and disease management. An in-depth understanding of pathogenesis forms the foundation of disease control and health promotion.

Gurbina

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